MAKING OBSERVATIONS

Looking at things closely is one of the oldest and most fundamental scientific methods. Investigations usually begin with observing something and wondering about it. Every step after that-from coming up with a hypothesis to running a test to analyzing the...

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ASKING QUESTIONS

It’s fine for younger children to ask “What’s that?” but scientific investigation usually requires more precise queries. As your child grows, teach him to refine and focus questions. Break broad questions into sets of smaller ones ...

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FORMING A HYPOTHESIS

Once your child has posed a question, he may want to form a hypothesis.  A hypothesis is really nothing more than an educated guess about why or how something happens-a possible explanation based on the information you’ve already observed. After fo...

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DRAWING A CONCLUSION

After analyzing the data, your child can practice coming up with a conclusion-a statement that sums up what he’s learned. The conclusion should be about the question he started out to answer. Urge him to consider all possible explanations for the re...

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AT-HOME SCIENCE SUPPLIES

Children don’t need a whole lot of fancy equipment to learn science, but a few supplies do wonders for their will to explore. One or two items for a kid’s home lab might make a great birthday gift. Here are some ideas: magnifying glass magnets...

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